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Matcha Daifuku with Red Bean Filling

Daifukumochi, or Daifuku, is a traditional Japanese sweet consisting of an outer layer of mochi stuffed with sweet filling. This time we're making matcha daifuku, which is made of matcha mochi skin with red bean filling. It's extremely easy to make and this recipe uses mostly natural ingredients. It takes no more than 5 minutes and can be made even when you're travelling. No baking required.

Ingredients (making 8 daifuku):
tapioca four (or Mochiko flour): 140g
matcha powder: 10g
cane sugar: 40g
water: 175g
red bean paste to taste

matcha mochi

Instructions:
1. Combine tapioca, matcha powder and sugar together in a microwave-safe bowl

matcha mochi
2. Add water and stir until smooth; there should be no dry powder or clumps
matcha mochi
3. Use Saran Wrap or a microwave-safe lid to cover the bowl
4. Microwave for 1 minute
5. Take it out, stir, and put it back into microwave for another 1 minute
6. Get a cutting board ready, spread plenty of corn flour/icing sugar on it to prevent sticking
7. Carefully remove the bowl from the microwave as it's quite hot. Use a wet spatula to scrape the bowl and transfer the mochi dough onto the cutting board

8. Press the dough until it's about 1/2 inch thick
matcha mochi
9. Cut the dough into 8 pieces; scoop red bean paste, place in the centre of dough,  and roll it into a ball. 

10. Dust with matcha powder/icing sugar if preferred. Best to consume within a day. Do not refrigerate as mochi skin will become hard.

matcha mochi

Other tips:
1. You can replace matcha powder with cocoa powder to make chocolate flavour, or just plain mochi
2. Other fillings such as black sesame, fresh fruits are all good options.
3. You can make red bean paste at home (I use store brand this time as I have no dry red beans at the time). Just cook the dry red bean until soft and drain; put into a blender, add sugar and a bit of water, and blend until smooth. 

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